Tag Archive: writers


Epenthesis-Episode 014: Villains

Funny thing is, I just finished making the villain for my story a couple days ago and I got an email last night to talk about it! It’s weird when these things happen.

Hope everyone is having an awesome NaNoWriMo if you’re participating!

Epenthesis-Episode 013: Believable Characters

Summary: Talking about Murdering Your Darlings, creating believable flaws, and how you can avoid making Mary Sues. I also talk about Carrie Vaughn’s Kitty Norville series and how to use unexpected contradictions to surprise the reader.

I’m thinking of writing a text blog tomorrow to give me a little break from podcasting. Or maybe a video blog! Would you guys like to see me making faces while I talk about writing?

 

 

Epenthesis-Episode 012: Working Outline

Where I talk about working outlines, why I hated Stephenie Meyer’s New Moon, and how watching movies like Stranger Than Fiction can help you structure your scenes. It was really fun to do and I had no idea it was going to be the longest one yet! I apparently have a lot to say when it comes to outlines. It’ll definitely come in handy when November 1st rolls around for National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo).

I believe I mentioned that this episode would be on another topic but I decided that this is what I wanted to talk about today. I’ll get into some of my pre-planned stuff on Friday. :) have a great day till then!

Epenthesis-Episode 011: Filling the Void

Update on this dreary, rainy Monday! Just got back from the National Publicity Summit in NYC, had a great time, but now  I’m sick so you may get to hear my sexy sick voice in the next episode. This one’s a follow up to my blog A Relationship is Like a Character where I talk about the void and character motivation. Until next time!

And thus rounds out the last of the Dialogue series of podcasts:

Part 1: Episode 008: Dialogue

Part 2: Episode 009: Dialogue Tags

Today’s episode:

Epenthesis-Episode 010: Action Around Dialogue

Today’s episode was fun to record since I got so excited talking about it. Dialogue is a great tool, but the action around dialogue really brings a scene together. It’s important to know that your dialogue and your actions create two very different effects, and together are like harmonies that can make a scene really shine.

I’ll be in NYC this week but I’m hoping to have my episodes post while I’m gone.

Next Wednesday’s Episode: Episode 011: Filling the Void

Have a wonderful Monday :)

Epenthesis-Episode 006: Plot vs. Theme

Wherein I talk about plot, theme, and how they’re different. I also talk about time travel, Sailor Moon, and my secret new writing project that I hope to keep secret…but I reveal more about in upcoming podcast.

So, I was eventually going to get to this since I can go on very long rants about all kinds of issues in writing, but there are those cleverer (or at least faster) than I who have already written about some of these problems.

This one’s REALLY GOOD so check them out.

As a side note, these are all things you should look at WHEN YOU’RE EDITING! Do not try to stop yourself from writing. If you use an adjective, for example, in a first draft, do not beat yourself over the head with it. Slice it off during editing, but don’t let it derail your writing. The more you practice, the less you’ll do these mistakes.

One final thing: I’m playing with podcasts now. You’ll get to hear me ranting live and in surround sound! Or at least loudly. I’ll link to it when I get the blasted thing done.

Creating Setting (continued)

My friend Night-mare wrote a response to my blog here and of course, that got my brain thinking of some advance techniques for playing with setting. If you want to see the first part of Creating Setting, go here.

Advanced Tip for Setting

Night-mare mentions how different characters should have different feelings when it comes to their surroundings. A person’s background and experiences will always color their perception of their surroundings. Now, the easy answer is to match the internal mood to the external: if your main character is depressed, make it rain. If your two main characters are having their very first romantic kiss, have a perfect sunset hang behind them. If the villain has just appeared, have a lightening storm.

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I’ve always been fascinated by people’s philosophy about writing. It seems everyone has a different opinion: even when people agree, it seems as if everyone’s method is just a little bit different. I tend to ignore advice about when to write – what time of day is best, for example – because I feel that it is entirely subjective according to a person’s schedule. When I was in high school, the best time for me to write was at 5 PM until 8 PM every day because that was the time after I got out of school and before dinner. On weekends I tended to write at the same time because I’d grown used to it. When I started college, my hours were a lot crazier so I tended to write later at night – around 7 PM until 9 PM since we ate dinner later. When I went to grad school, my five month old puppy woke me at five in the morning every day to go out, so I tended to be awake a lot longer so I wrote from 8 AM until 10 AM, when I needed to either play with her or go to class. Also, because I tended to have very late classes, I tended to go straight to bed after coming home instead of staying up to write.

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I’ve been an outstanding note-taker since school. Don’t ask me how I got to be that way, it’s not as if I trained for it or anything. All I know is that come exam time, people started asking for my phone number and email awfully quick to get some last-minute notes.

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