Hi everyone,

It’s been a while since I wrote anything in this blog. A friend of mine sent me this fascinating link entitled Five Geek Social Fallacies and I thought I’d share it here since I found it informative and interesting. I’ve been guilty of all of them and of course, thinking of them got me thinking of other things, namely the way that the Internet acts like a magnifying glass for emotions and explosions, and the need for human interaction sometimes.

As a writer and editor, I spend a lot of time behind a computer monitor. I have online communities I’m a part of, and a lot of friends in different states and countries. I’ve recently experienced some Internet drama that feels epic while it happens but then feels stupid when related to someone else verbally. Sometimes, despite or because of a strong Internet community, it is doubly important to get out of the computer and into reality. Talking to people face-to-face, or even on the phone or through Skype is just as important as the work itself, sometimes. It’s easy for me, for example, to lose perspective sometimes and I think that that contributes to instances like the ones in the link above.

Interestingly, this link also reveals a lot about the Millennial generation, in the way that I see it. The tolerance, definitely, and also the socialization process. Online bullying also relates to this, since it’s far easier to pick fights and descend to all new lows when you can’t see the other person’s face. Communities do tend to self-police, but sometimes this is not a good thing. “Fans” can become rabid and attack people who they think threat the community, and those who are ostracized tend not to be ignored, but attacked.

While this behavior is not something to boast about, I can find a bit of patience for people who are teenagers who do these things. However, when I see people my own age or older creating some of these issues, I really have to wonder what they’re like in real life, to think that their behavior online is somehow acceptable.