Tag Archive: setting


Epenthesis-Episode 011: Filling the Void

Update on this dreary, rainy Monday! Just got back from the National Publicity Summit in NYC, had a great time, but now  I’m sick so you may get to hear my sexy sick voice in the next episode. This one’s a follow up to my blog A Relationship is Like a Character where I talk about the void and character motivation. Until next time!

And thus rounds out the last of the Dialogue series of podcasts:

Part 1: Episode 008: Dialogue

Part 2: Episode 009: Dialogue Tags

Today’s episode:

Epenthesis-Episode 010: Action Around Dialogue

Today’s episode was fun to record since I got so excited talking about it. Dialogue is a great tool, but the action around dialogue really brings a scene together. It’s important to know that your dialogue and your actions create two very different effects, and together are like harmonies that can make a scene really shine.

I’ll be in NYC this week but I’m hoping to have my episodes post while I’m gone.

Next Wednesday’s Episode: Episode 011: Filling the Void

Have a wonderful Monday :)

Hello everyone and welcome to Episode 009! I’m very excited because now you’re getting the freshest, no-more-archived podcasts. I’m going to be doing them on a schedule now so you can expect one every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. As I get into my schedule, I’m hoping to start video blogs on Fridays.

For now, here’s your episode!

Epenthesis-Episode 009: Dialogue Tags

Next up is Monday’s Episode 010 on Action Around Dialogue, one I was very happy to record. Have a great weekend!

Previous Episode: Dialogue (Part 1)

Action Around Dialogue (Part 3)

Epenthesis-Episode 007: Brainstorming

I was apprehensive about sharing details about my upcoming project but I wrote about 2,500 words last night so I’m on a good high about it. It also helped me figure out some sticky plot points by talking it out!

Episode 004: Discarding Old Tools I talk a little in the beginning about Episode 4 so here’s a quick link.

Episode 006: Plot vs. Theme I mention this one too so here’s a quick link for it.

 

Progress Stats:

Current Wordcount: 28,323

Goal: 70,000

Draft: First

Deadline: October 31, 2011

Epenthesis-Episode 006: Plot vs. Theme

Wherein I talk about plot, theme, and how they’re different. I also talk about time travel, Sailor Moon, and my secret new writing project that I hope to keep secret…but I reveal more about in upcoming podcast.

Epenthesis-Episode 002: Editing Checklist

Creating Setting (continued)

My friend Night-mare wrote a response to my blog here and of course, that got my brain thinking of some advance techniques for playing with setting. If you want to see the first part of Creating Setting, go here.

Advanced Tip for Setting

Night-mare mentions how different characters should have different feelings when it comes to their surroundings. A person’s background and experiences will always color their perception of their surroundings. Now, the easy answer is to match the internal mood to the external: if your main character is depressed, make it rain. If your two main characters are having their very first romantic kiss, have a perfect sunset hang behind them. If the villain has just appeared, have a lightening storm.

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I like my story with a lot of layers. In most of the creative writing classes I’ve taken, the how-to books I’ve read, and even in online chatrooms and face-to-face discussions with other writers, the issue of setting always comes up at some point in the conversation. Where is the story taking place? What time period? What’s the flavor of the story like?

While knowing what century your medieval castle is based off of is great, there is more to setting than the physical and geographical parts of it. Setting also has to do with backstory. Movies are especially good at this because the opening scenes in general give us a chance to interpret a number of things before any action takes place. You get a sweeping view of the landscape, maybe a few scattered conversations, some shots of the main character (so you know who to pay attention to) and some nice foreshadowing for later. In writing, you don’t necessarily get that time to ease the reader in before the action starts, but the concept is the same. Your main character has a history you will never see and a future you can only speculate about.

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Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov

Since I can’t seem to stop myself, I’m reading another book now (this will be number 43 for the year, or at least the ones I tracked through my Kindle app on my iPhone) and getting really into it. When I was young, I didn’t think there was anything strange about reading three books a week. In fact, my English teacher in middle school didn’t believe me when I said I read this much. So my school tested me – assigned a number of books and asked me to do a project for them. Not only did I do all of this, I distinctly remember complaining about how easy these books were. They’d given me interested material, certainly, but I was more into classical books (I didn’t know they were classics at the time, I just thought they sounded interesting). In high school, I hated the so-called classics we were forced to read because my teachers would dissect all the good parts, overanalyze and read into every line (and even stuff that wasn’t in the book at all) and then assign stupid projects that only served to make us (the students) hate those books even more. In the end, I managed to get away with not reading the books and simply waiting until someone else in my class started talking and then picking up the thread of conversation from there. I… was really good at being a bad student. Not that anyone noticed since I had a 3.78 GPA in my college prep high school, but that’s not the point. I was really good at faking interest in these books.

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There is something to be said about editing your novel. I’ll focus on fiction since that’s where I am most comfortable. My writing buddy Night-mare and I are struggling through her revisions. She got stuck at a difficult scene and recently managed to break through, creating an enormously more powerful scene. Now we’re onto another turning point in the story and she’s fighting it again. I feel a little helpless sometimes, since I’m not the one struggling through the scenes, but I remember very clearly when I went through something like twenty-three drafts for Skull Juggler: Disenchanted before I finally gave it up for self publication.

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