Tag Archive: high school


Just Write – A Philosophy

I’ve always been fascinated by people’s philosophy about writing. It seems everyone has a different opinion: even when people agree, it seems as if everyone’s method is just a little bit different. I tend to ignore advice about when to write – what time of day is best, for example – because I feel that it is entirely subjective according to a person’s schedule. When I was in high school, the best time for me to write was at 5 PM until 8 PM every day because that was the time after I got out of school and before dinner. On weekends I tended to write at the same time because I’d grown used to it. When I started college, my hours were a lot crazier so I tended to write later at night – around 7 PM until 9 PM since we ate dinner later. When I went to grad school, my five month old puppy woke me at five in the morning every day to go out, so I tended to be awake a lot longer so I wrote from 8 AM until 10 AM, when I needed to either play with her or go to class. Also, because I tended to have very late classes, I tended to go straight to bed after coming home instead of staying up to write.

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Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov

Since I can’t seem to stop myself, I’m reading another book now (this will be number 43 for the year, or at least the ones I tracked through my Kindle app on my iPhone) and getting really into it. When I was young, I didn’t think there was anything strange about reading three books a week. In fact, my English teacher in middle school didn’t believe me when I said I read this much. So my school tested me – assigned a number of books and asked me to do a project for them. Not only did I do all of this, I distinctly remember complaining about how easy these books were. They’d given me interested material, certainly, but I was more into classical books (I didn’t know they were classics at the time, I just thought they sounded interesting). In high school, I hated the so-called classics we were forced to read because my teachers would dissect all the good parts, overanalyze and read into every line (and even stuff that wasn’t in the book at all) and then assign stupid projects that only served to make us (the students) hate those books even more. In the end, I managed to get away with not reading the books and simply waiting until someone else in my class started talking and then picking up the thread of conversation from there. I… was really good at being a bad student. Not that anyone noticed since I had a 3.78 GPA in my college prep high school, but that’s not the point. I was really good at faking interest in these books.

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