Archive for May, 2011


Logical Conclusions

I’ve been reading a lot more mystery novels lately. Wonderful things really, always good to exercise the brain sometimes. That led me to thinking about constructing intricate and logical plots (for mysteries, this is essential) and how I could apply some of the concepts I’m learning from mystery-reading to my own work.

That got me thinking of geometry (god, I hated you geometry, but some part of you penetrated my poor, abused brain and has stuck with me ever since I had to take you). The same concept was in my LSAT prep book and they called it logic games. Essentially, the point of the exercise (in geometry and also in law school) is to find the flawed logic, that place where you jump to a conclusion that has no real evidence. Something may seem to have a specific conclusion but not necessarily.

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Since I already started sifting through all the blogs I’ve been neglecting lately, I found this great writing advice from Marissa Meyer, a really awesome up and coming writer, and a nice person. I have waxed poetic about her before.

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

Yes, she really does all of this. Yes, she is more awesome than you. Accept it, embrace it, follow her awesome. It’s because of her that my reading list has gone supernova and I’ve started feeling as if I can actually organize myself into a writer.

Was going through my backlog of blogs I normally read (oh my god, I am so bad at keeping up with all of the news I love reading about) and I find this short list of Three Editing Tips to Help Get Published by one of my favorite authors, Jordan Castillo Price, the author of one of my favorite series: PsyCop. It’s m/m for anyone who gets squeamish about that sort of thing but the plot, characters, and everything about that series is so phenomenal, I would highly recommend it to anyone who wants to see how a master puts together a great story.

I’ve been an outstanding note-taker since school. Don’t ask me how I got to be that way, it’s not as if I trained for it or anything. All I know is that come exam time, people started asking for my phone number and email awfully quick to get some last-minute notes.

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I have been arguing with a friend for the past few days about romance, chemistry, and relationships in writing. In the course of our conversations, I said something that made me think about something that has been obvious to me for a long time.

A relationship is its own character.

I’ve been reading a hell of a lot of books recently: anything written by Josh Lanyon (but especially his Adrien English series), just finished “Matched” by Ally Condie, I’m halfway through “Uglies” by Scott Westerfeld, and I recently read “Discord’s Apple” by Carrie Vaughn. A quick plug: Josh Lanyon is m/m (male/male) or LGBT. His books are PHENOMENAL, his character building and world building are AMAZING. Not to mention his storytelling is out of this world. Check out anything by him to see all of the following points illustrated masterfully.

Now, I’m going to address three key points by using the other three books as examples that I found while reading. SPOILER ALERT. I will be half-reviewing, half-discussing these books so don’t read further if you don’t want to know what happens in the books. You have been warned!

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